Human Rights and the Guantanamo Bay Detention Camp – 2007

Reference: Women of Reform Judaism

To read the full text from the article, please visit the Women of Reform Judasism website at: http://www.wrj.org/Advocacy/ResolutionsStatements/Resolutions2007/HumanRightsandGuantanamo/Default.aspx

 

Justice, Justice shall you pursue. (Deut. 16:20)

If I am not for myself, who will be for me? If I am only for myself, what am I? If not now, when?
(Hillel)

ISSUE
The use of torture and other forms of extreme physical or mental cruelty, the suspension of Habeas Corpus, the continued imprisonment of hundreds of men at Guantanamo without charges and without trials, and the use of military commissions violate fundamental principles of human rights.

BACKGROUND
For almost sixty years, Women of Reform Judaism has been a strong proponent of human rights in the United States, Canada, and throughout the world. In 1948, at its 17th biennial assembly, WRJ noted that “human rights and fundamental freedoms are basic to the maintenance of peace…vigilance is necessary ‘to secure these rights’ both within the nation and in international society.” This position was reiterated in a 1949 resolution on human rights by the executive board. In 1954 it stated, “The whole field of human rights is of deepest concern to the National Federation of Temple Sisterhood [now Women of Reform Judaism].” Further, in 1979 a WRJ 32nd biennial assembly resolution on human rights urged all governments to “Protest and work toward the cessation of harassment and disappearance of individuals, imprisonment without explanation, the denial of the right to a fair trial . . . in whatever country such violations of human rights occur.” Finally, in 2002, the WRJ executive committee issued a statement of concern about the system of military tribunals then being created.

 

To read the full text from the article, please visit the Women of Reform Judasism website at: http://www.wrj.org/Advocacy/ResolutionsStatements/Resolutions2007/HumanRightsandGuantanamo/Default.aspx