Organic Farming – An Overview

Reference: Wikipedia

Organic farming is a form of agriculture that relies on techniques such as crop rotation, green manure, compost and biological pest control. Organic farming uses fertilizers and pesticides but excludes or strictly limits the use of manufactured (synthetic) fertilizers, pesticides (which include herbicides, insecticides and fungicides), plant growth regulators such as hormones, livestock antibiotics, food additives, genetically modified organisms,[1] human sewage sludge, and nanomaterials.[2]

Organic agricultural methods are internationally regulated and legally enforced by many nations, based in large part on the standards set by the International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM), an international umbrella organization for organic farming organizations established in 1972.[3] IFOAM defines the overarching goal of organic farming as:

“Organic agriculture is a production system that sustains the health of soils, ecosystems and people. It relies on ecological processes, biodiversity and cycles adapted to local conditions, rather than the use of inputs with adverse effects. Organic agriculture combines tradition, innovation and science to benefit the shared environment and promote fair relationships and a good quality of life for all involved…”
—International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements[4]

Since 1990, the market for organic products has grown from next to nothing statistically, reaching $55 billion in 2009 according to Organic Monitor (www.organicmonitor.com). This demand has driven a similar increase in organically managed farmland which has grown over the years 2001-2011 at a compounding rate of 8.9% per annum.[5] As of 2011, approximately 37,000,000 hectares (91,000,000 acres) worldwide were farmed organically, representing approximately 0.9 percent of total world farmland (2009).[6]

Organic farming systems

There are several organic farming systems. Biodynamic farming is a comprehensive approach, with its own international governing body. The Do Nothing Farming method focuses on a minimum of mechanical cultivation and labor for grain crops. French intensive and biointensive, methods are well-suited to organic principles. Other techniques are permaculture and no-till farming.

While fundamentally different, large-scale agriculture and organic farming are not entirely mutually exclusive. For example, Integrated Pest Management is a multifaceted strategy that can include synthetic pesticides as a last resort—both organic and conventional farms use IPM systems for pest control.[18]

Methods

“An organic farm, properly speaking, is not one that uses certain methods and substances and avoids others; it is a farm whose structure is formed in imitation of the structure of a natural system that has the integrity, the independence and the benign dependence of an organism”
—Wendell Berry, “The Gift of Good Land”

 

Organic farming methods combine scientific knowledge of ecology and modern technology with traditional farming practices based on naturally occurring biological processes. Organic farming methods are studied in the field of agroecology. While conventional agriculture uses synthetic pesticides and water-soluble synthetically purified fertilizers, organic farmers are restricted by regulations to using natural pesticides and fertilizers. The principal methods of organic farming include crop rotation, green manures and compost, biological pest control, and mechanical cultivation. These measures use the natural environment to enhance agricultural productivity: legumes are planted to fix nitrogen into the soil, natural insect predators are encouraged, crops are rotated to confuse pests and renew soil, and natural materials such as potassium bicarbonate[19] and mulches are used to control disease and weeds. Hardier plants are generated through plant breeding rather than genetic engineering.

Crop diversity

Crop diversity is a distinctive characteristic of organic farming. Conventional farming focuses on mass production of one crop in one location, a practice called monoculture. The science of agroecology has revealed the benefits of polyculture (multiple crops in the same space), which is often employed in organic farming.[20] Planting a variety of vegetable crops supports a wider range of beneficial insects, soil microorganisms, and other factors that add up to overall farm health.[21]

Soil management

Organic farming relies heavily on the natural breakdown of organic matter, using techniques like green manure and composting, to replace nutrients taken from the soil by previous crops. This biological process, driven by microorganisms such as mycorrhiza, allows the natural production of nutrients in the soil throughout the growing season, and has been referred to as feeding the soil to feed the plant. Organic farming uses a variety of methods to improve soil fertility, including crop rotation, cover cropping, reduced tillage, and application of compost. By reducing tillage, soil is not inverted and exposed to air; less carbon is lost to the atmosphere resulting in more soil organic carbon. This has an added benefit of carbon sequestration which can reduce green house gases and aid in reversing climate change.

Plants need nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, as well as micronutrients and symbiotic relationships with fungi and other organisms to flourish, but getting enough nitrogen, and particularly synchronization so that plants get enough nitrogen at the right time (when plants need it most), is a challenge for organic farmers.[22] Crop rotation and green manure (“cover crops”) help to provide nitrogen through legumes (more precisely, the Fabaceae family) which fix nitrogen from the atmosphere through symbiosis with rhizobial bacteria. Intercropping, which is sometimes used for insect and disease control, can also increase soil nutrients, but the competition between the legume and the crop can be problematic and wider spacing between crop rows is required. Crop residues can be ploughed back into the soil, and different plants leave different amounts of nitrogen, potentially aiding synchronization.[22] Organic farmers also use animal manure, certain processed fertilizers such as seed meal and various mineral powders such as rock phosphate and greensand, a naturally occurring form of potash which provides potassium. Together these methods help to control erosion. In some cases pH may need to be amended. Natural pH amendments include lime and sulfur, but in the U.S. some compounds such as iron sulfate, aluminum sulfate, magnesium sulfate, and soluble boron products are allowed in organic farming.[23]:43

Mixed farms with both livestock and crops can operate as ley farms, whereby the land gathers fertility through growing nitrogen-fixing forage grasses such as white clover or alfalfa and grows cash crops or cereals when fertility is established. Farms without livestock (“stockless”) may find it more difficult to maintain soil fertility, and may rely more on external inputs such as imported manure as well as grain legumes and green manures, although grain legumes may fix limited nitrogen because they are harvested. Horticultural farms growing fruits and vegetables which operate in protected conditions are often even more reliant upon external inputs.[22]

Biological research on soil and soil organisms has proven beneficial to organic farming. Varieties of bacteria and fungi break down chemicals, plant matter and animal waste into productive soil nutrients. In turn, they produce benefits of healthier yields and more productive soil for future crops.[24] Fields with less or no manure display significantly lower yields, due to decreased soil microbe community, providing a healthier, more arable soil system.[25]

References

  1. ^ Directorate General for Agriculture and Rural Development of the European Commission What is organic farming
  2. ^ Paull, John (2011) “Nanomaterials in food and agriculture: The big issue of small matter for organic food and farming”, Proceedings of the Third Scientific Conference of ISOFAR (International Society of Organic Agriculture Research), 28 September – 1 October, Namyangju, Korea., 2:96-99.
  3. ^ Paull, John “From France to the World: The International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM)”, Journal of Social Research & Policy, 2010, 1(2):93-102.
  4. ^ “Definition of Organic Agriculture”. IFOAM. http://www.ifoam.org/growing_organic/definitions/doa/index.html. Retrieved 2008-09-30.
  5. ^ Paull, John (2011) “The Uptake of Organic Agriculture: A Decade of Worldwide Development”, Journal of Social and Development Sciences, 2 (3), pp. 111-120.
  6. ^ a b c d Willer, Helga; Kilcher, Lukas (2011). the organic world homepage “The World of Organic Agriculture. Statistics and Emerging Trends”. Bonn; FiBL, Frick: IFOAM. http://www.organic-world.net the organic world homepage.
  7. ^ Douglas John McConnell (2003). The Forest Farms of Kandy: And Other Gardens of Complete Design. p. 1. http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=QYBSfUJPQXcC&lpg=PP1&dq=the%20forest%20farms%20of%20kandy%20and%20other%20gardens%20of%20complete%20design&pg=PA1#v=onepage&q&f=false.
  8. ^ Horne, Paul Anthony (2008). Integrated pest management for crops and pastures. CSIRO Publishing. p. 2. ISBN 978-0-643-09257-0. http://books.google.com/?id=dhO4HAQbNU8C&pg=PA2&dq=pesticide+era+1950s#v=onepage&q=pesticide%20era%201950s&f=false.
  9. ^ a b Paull, John (2006) The Farm as Organism: The Foundational Idea of Organic Agriculture Elementals ~ Journal of Bio-Dynamics Tasmania 83:14–18
  10. ^ Paull, John (2011). “Attending the First Organic Agriculture Course: Rudolf Steiner’s Agriculture Course at Koberwitz, 1924”. European Journal of Social Sciences 21 (1): 64–70.
  11. ^ a b c Holger Kirchmann and Lars Bergström, editors. Organic Crop Production – Ambitions and Limitations Springer. Berlin 2008.
  12. ^ Paull John (2011). “Attending the First Organic Agriculture Course: Rudolf Steiner’s Agriculture Course at Koberwitz, 1924” (PDF). European Journal of Social Sciences 21 (1): 64–70. http://orgprints.org/18809/1/Paull2011KoberwitzEJSS.pdf.
  13. ^ Lotter, D.W. (2003) Organic agriculture. Journal of Sustainable Agriculture 21(4)
  14. ^ Biodynamics is listed as a “modern organic agriculture” system in: Minou Yussefi and Helga Willer (Eds.), The World of Organic Agriculture: Statistics and Future Prospects, 2003, p. 57
  15. ^ Biodynamic agriculture is “a type of organic system”. Charles Francis and J. van Wart (2009), “History of Organic Farming and Certification”, in Organic farming: the ecological system. American Society of Agronomy. pp. 3-18
  16. ^ Stinner, D.H (2007), “The Science of Organic Farming”, in William Lockeretz, Organic Farming: An International History, Oxfordshire, UK & Cambridge, Massachusetts: CAB International (CABI), pp. 40–72, ISBN 978-0-85199-833-6, http://books.google.com/?id=25QnL3-njZQC&printsec=frontcover&dq=%22Organic+farming%22#v=onepage&q&f=false, retrieved 10 August 2010 ebook ISBN 978-1-84593-289-3
  17. ^ Paull, John “China’s Organic Revolution”, Journal of Organic Systems (2007) 2 (1): 1-11.
  18. ^ “Integrated Pest Management”. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. http://www.epa.gov/oecaagct/tipm.html. Retrieved 1 January 2013.
  19. ^ FiBL (2006) Use of potassium bicarbonate as a fungicide in organic farming
  20. ^ Fargione J, and D Tilman. 2002. “Competition and coexistence in terrestrial plants”. Pages 156-206 In U. Sommer and B Worm editors, Competition and Coexistence. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Germany. [1]
  21. ^ Linker, H.M.; D.B. Orr and M.E. Barbercheck. “Insect Management On Organic Farms”. Center for Environmental Farming Systems. http://www.cefs.ncsu.edu/resources/organicproductionguide/insectmgmtfinaljan09.pdf. Retrieved 1 January 2013.
  22. ^ a b c Watson CA, Atkinson D, Gosling P, Jackson LR, Rayns FW. (2002). “Managing soil fertility in organic farming systems”. Soil Use and Management 18: 239–247. doi:10.1111/j.1475-2743.2002.tb00265.x. http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/119192119/abstract. Retrieved 2009-05-29. Preprint with free full-text.
  23. ^ a b c Gillman J. (2008). The Truth About Organic Farming.
  24. ^ Ingram, M. (2007). “Biology and Beyond: The Science of ‘‘Back to Nature’’ Farming in the United States.”. Annals of the Association of American Geographers 97 (2): 298–312. doi:10.1111/j.1467-8306.2007.00537.x.
  25. ^ a b Fließbach, A.; Oberholzer, H.; Gunst, L.; Mäder, P. (2006). “Soil organic matter and biological soil quality indicators after 21 years of organic and conventional farming.”. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 118: 273–284. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167880906001794.